Catching up with Runaway Hot Plates

Attached to this link is a PDF version of the poster below on Runaway Hot Plates. This poster was part of the DCHAS collection at the 2017 SciMix sessions in Washington, DC. Questions about the poster should be directed to the authors:

  • Kimberly Brown of the Office of Environmental Health and Radiation Safety at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA,
  • Mark Mathews of the Environmental Safety and Health Directorate, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN and
  • Joseph Pickel of the Physical Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN

Developing a Safety Culture

Institutional & Enterprise Level Efforts to Developing a Safety Culture

The Chemical Safety Board: Safety is good business and good policy. V. Sutherland

Safety Googles aren’t for nerds. T. George

Changing the federal oversight model of the Department of Energy National Laboratories. J. McBrearty

Are you prepared for a journey? K. Jeskie

Grassroots Approaches to Developing a Safety Culture

Improving Safety in the Chemical Enterprise Through Transparent Sharing of Best Safety Practices. M. Jones, L. Sellor, Dow

Back to Safety Basics at Northwestern University. M. Blayney

Building a Safety Culture: An Undergrad Perspective N. Fredstrom

Implementation Of Enhanced Science Classroom Safety Standards And Hygiene Plans at the High Chemical School Level B. Kennedy

OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Programs. D. Kalinowski

The Joint Safety Team: A researcher-led initiative for improving academic safety culture C. Gee

Collaborative efforts between faculty and embedded safety professionals to improve critical thinking skills of undergraduates
S. Sigmann

Characterising bias in regulatory risk and decision analysis

There’s an interesting, although dense, article at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016303877
entitled “Characterising bias in regulatory risk and decision analysis: An analysis of heuristics applied in health technology appraisal, chemicals regulation, and climate change governance”. It describes the root issues that many of us face in using specific tools (GHS, Job Hazard Analysis, Control Banding, etc.) to make decisions in the face of uncertainty. I am particularly interested in the article’s discussion of decision rules in Table 1 and how that compares to the various approaches outlined in Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories.

In my mind, the goal of the article is to remind us to put some error bars arounds our decision-making criteria as we proceed with any of these approaches.

Building a Safety Culture Across the Chemical Enterprise

Building and Promoting SMS in the Federal Government. R. Meidl

Safety training vs safety education N. Bharti

Challenges and Rewards in Enforcing Laboratory Safety – First Year on the Job. R. Malaisamy

Safety Guidelines for the Chemistry Professional. K.P. Fivizzani

Safety Culture Partnering Faculty S. Elwood, R.M. Izzo, K. Angjelo

Development and implementation of a researcher oriented program J.G. Palmer

Establishing a Sustainable Safety Culture in Academic Research Labs. K.A. Miller

Chemophobia

Chemicals – The Good, Bad, and the Ugly S.B. Sigmann

Public Perception of the Chemical Enterprise The Good The Bad and the Uncertain. M.E. Jones

ACS role in Communicating chemical safety. J. Kemsley

Developing design principles for ‘lesson learned’ laboratory safety videos. H. Weizman

It’s no accident that many journalists don’t write clearly about lab safety incidents. B. Benderly

Hazmat event reporting in the media. R. Stuart

Risk Communication for the Chemist and Non-Chemist. R. Izzo