JCHAS Editor’s Spotlight: Comparison between active and passive workplace sampling

The Editor’s Spotlight for the November / December 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

A comparison study between passive and active workplace personal air monitoring techniques for airborne isopropyl alcohol concentrations
by
Austin K.Simons, Rodney G.Handy, Darrah K.Sleeth, Leon F.Pahler and Matthew S.Thiese

The abridged abstract is:
This research project involved a comparison between the performance of active and passive sampling methods used to collect isopropyl alcohol vapor in an industrial setting. This field experiment was conducted in a real-world industry setting with workers exposed to isopropyl alcohol. Based on the strong correlation values and the trend of passive samplers reporting higher results than the active samplers, occupational health specialists could reliably use the passive samplers in this study to demonstrate compliance to isopropyl alcohol exposure limits.

This article and the rest of the issue can be found at
http://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/journal-of-chemical-health-and-safety/vol/24/issue/6

Also included in this issue of JCHAS are:

Editorial: What a year!
Harry J. Elston

Safety and ethics in ACS and major scientific and engineering societies: A gap analysis
Daniel R. Kuespert

Response letter from CEPA to “Safety and Ethics in ACS and Major Scientific and Engineering Societies: A Gap Analysis”
The ACS Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs

Safety and health risk perceptions: A cross-sectional study of New Jersey hair and nail salon clients
Lindsey J. Milich, Derek G. Shendell, Judith M. Graber

UN-GHS — Physical hazard classifications of chemicals: A critical review of combinations of hazard classes
Cordula Wilrich, Elisabeth Brandes, Heike Michael-Schulz, Volkmar Schröder, Klaus-Dieter Wehrstedt

A comparison of occupational exposure limits and their relationship to reactive oxide species
Original research article
Tracy Zontek, Burton R. Ogle, Scott Hollenbeck, John T. Jankovic

“Improving Chemical Safety in Schools” Workshop at SERMACS

Sammye Sigmann presented a workshop on laboratory safety resources from the American Chemical Society and other organizations for the teaching environment at the secondary and undergraduate level. Topics addressed include:

  • Conceptual overview  of teacher liability relative to lab safety
  • The ins and outs of the Globally Harmonized System and Safety Data Sheets
  • Risk Assessment models for common teaching demonstrations
  • Evaluation of on line videos demonstrating chemistry

PDF versions of her materials for this workshop are linked to below below.

SERMACS Lab Safety Stories Symposium

 

Learning Laboratory Safety Through Storytelling

The story of chemical safety in the 20th (and 21st) century. R. Stuart

How does an EHS professional engage their audience?. M.B. Koza

Using learning points to create a sound safety baseline. K.W. Kretchman

A series of unfortunate events: A personal story. S.B. Sigmann

Stories of laboratory incidents teach us lessons about safety. R.H. Hill

 

Safety Guidelines for the Chemistry Professional

Over the course of 2016 and 2017, representatives of the American Chemical Society’s Committee on Chemical Safety and Division of Chemical Health and Safety developed an ACS policy statement on chemical safety as well as document describing Safety Guidelines for the Chemistry Professional. These are designed to support chemists as they perform their daily work in safe and environmentally responsible way.

Webinar on Strategies for Chemical Threat Reduction

Avoiding the Next Chemical Catastrophe: Strategies for Chemical Threat Reduction

Co-sponsored by

October 19, 2017 @ 2:00pm ET

Every lab has chemicals that are vital to research and experimentation but these same chemicals whether you are in industry or academia, can be stolen and used by non-state actors for malevolent acts. Join Andrew Nelson of Sandia National Laboratories as he introduces strategies to mitigate the risks that small labs and universities face with theft of chemicals for chemical weapons, explosives, and illicit drug production.

Register at https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/acs-webinars/popular-chemistry/threat.html

What You Will Learn

  • Why chemical security is important to all labs with current examples of incidents
  • What considerations must be made in a security risk management system
  • How chemical security is a teachable skill and what resources are available to you today

Webinar Details

  • Date: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 2-3pm ET
  • Fee: Free to Attend
  • Download slides after presentation

 

Pistoia Alliance Chemical Safety Library CSL Datathon

Pistoia Alliance
Chemical Safety Library CSLDatathon

To increase the valuable content in the free Chemical Safety Library (CSL), we are hosting a 2-week datathon in October to promote submissions to the CSL. Participants will be encouraged to submit incidents from the literature, in internal files or from personal experience.

You could win a $100 gift card.

Please help us spread the word:
Download the CSL Datathon Flyer and share it widely!

Thank you for your support and help!

csladmin@pistoiaalliance.org

Watch out for #CSLDatathon and #CSLHackathon on twitter coming soon!

 

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Catching up with Runaway Hot Plates

Attached to this link is a PDF version of the poster below on Runaway Hot Plates. This poster was part of the DCHAS collection at the 2017 SciMix sessions in Washington, DC. Questions about the poster should be directed to the authors:

  • Kimberly Brown of the Office of Environmental Health and Radiation Safety at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA,
  • Mark Mathews of the Environmental Safety and Health Directorate, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN and
  • Joseph Pickel of the Physical Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN

Developing a Safety Culture

Institutional & Enterprise Level Efforts to Developing a Safety Culture

The Chemical Safety Board: Safety is good business and good policy. V. Sutherland

Safety Googles aren’t for nerds. T. George

Changing the federal oversight model of the Department of Energy National Laboratories. J. McBrearty

Are you prepared for a journey? K. Jeskie

Grassroots Approaches to Developing a Safety Culture

Improving Safety in the Chemical Enterprise Through Transparent Sharing of Best Safety Practices. M. Jones, L. Sellor, Dow

Back to Safety Basics at Northwestern University. M. Blayney

Building a Safety Culture: An Undergrad Perspective N. Fredstrom

Implementation Of Enhanced Science Classroom Safety Standards And Hygiene Plans at the High Chemical School Level B. Kennedy

OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Programs. D. Kalinowski

The Joint Safety Team: A researcher-led initiative for improving academic safety culture C. Gee

Collaborative efforts between faculty and embedded safety professionals to improve critical thinking skills of undergraduates
S. Sigmann

Characterising bias in regulatory risk and decision analysis

There’s an interesting, although dense, article at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016303877
entitled “Characterising bias in regulatory risk and decision analysis: An analysis of heuristics applied in health technology appraisal, chemicals regulation, and climate change governance”. It describes the root issues that many of us face in using specific tools (GHS, Job Hazard Analysis, Control Banding, etc.) to make decisions in the face of uncertainty. I am particularly interested in the article’s discussion of decision rules in Table 1 and how that compares to the various approaches outlined in Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories.

In my mind, the goal of the article is to remind us to put some error bars arounds our decision-making criteria as we proceed with any of these approaches.

Building a Safety Culture Across the Chemical Enterprise

Building and Promoting SMS in the Federal Government. R. Meidl

Safety training vs safety education N. Bharti

Challenges and Rewards in Enforcing Laboratory Safety – First Year on the Job. R. Malaisamy

Safety Guidelines for the Chemistry Professional. K.P. Fivizzani

Safety Culture Partnering Faculty S. Elwood, R.M. Izzo, K. Angjelo

Development and implementation of a researcher oriented program J.G. Palmer

Establishing a Sustainable Safety Culture in Academic Research Labs. K.A. Miller