Tag Archives: Safety Culture

SERMACS Lab Safety Stories Symposium

 

Learning Laboratory Safety Through Storytelling

The story of chemical safety in the 20th (and 21st) century. R. Stuart

How does an EHS professional engage their audience?. M.B. Koza

Using learning points to create a sound safety baseline. K.W. Kretchman

A series of unfortunate events: A personal story. S.B. Sigmann

Stories of laboratory incidents teach us lessons about safety. R.H. Hill

 

Safety Guidelines for the Chemistry Professional

Over the course of 2016 and 2017, representatives of the American Chemical Society’s Committee on Chemical Safety and Division of Chemical Health and Safety developed an ACS policy statement on chemical safety as well as document describing Safety Guidelines for the Chemistry Professional. These are designed to support chemists as they perform their daily work in safe and environmentally responsible way.

Developing a Safety Culture

Institutional & Enterprise Level Efforts to Developing a Safety Culture

The Chemical Safety Board: Safety is good business and good policy. V. Sutherland

Safety Googles aren’t for nerds. T. George

Changing the federal oversight model of the Department of Energy National Laboratories. J. McBrearty

Are you prepared for a journey? K. Jeskie

Grassroots Approaches to Developing a Safety Culture

Improving Safety in the Chemical Enterprise Through Transparent Sharing of Best Safety Practices. M. Jones, L. Sellor, Dow

Back to Safety Basics at Northwestern University. M. Blayney

Building a Safety Culture: An Undergrad Perspective N. Fredstrom

Implementation Of Enhanced Science Classroom Safety Standards And Hygiene Plans at the High Chemical School Level B. Kennedy

OSHA’s Voluntary Protection Programs. D. Kalinowski

The Joint Safety Team: A researcher-led initiative for improving academic safety culture C. Gee

Collaborative efforts between faculty and embedded safety professionals to improve critical thinking skills of undergraduates
S. Sigmann

Building a Safety Culture Across the Chemical Enterprise

Building and Promoting SMS in the Federal Government. R. Meidl

Safety training vs safety education N. Bharti

Challenges and Rewards in Enforcing Laboratory Safety – First Year on the Job. R. Malaisamy

Safety Guidelines for the Chemistry Professional. K.P. Fivizzani

Safety Culture Partnering Faculty S. Elwood, R.M. Izzo, K. Angjelo

Development and implementation of a researcher oriented program J.G. Palmer

Establishing a Sustainable Safety Culture in Academic Research Labs. K.A. Miller

Chemophobia

Chemicals – The Good, Bad, and the Ugly S.B. Sigmann

Public Perception of the Chemical Enterprise The Good The Bad and the Uncertain. M.E. Jones

ACS role in Communicating chemical safety. J. Kemsley

Developing design principles for ‘lesson learned’ laboratory safety videos. H. Weizman

It’s no accident that many journalists don’t write clearly about lab safety incidents. B. Benderly

Hazmat event reporting in the media. R. Stuart

Risk Communication for the Chemist and Non-Chemist. R. Izzo

JCHAS Spotlight: Ergonomics of Glove Boxes

The Editor’s Spotlight for the July / August 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

Rotator cuff strength balance in glovebox workers (link to PDF version)

By Cindy M. Lawton, Amelia M. Weaver, Martha K.Y. Chan, Michael E. Cournoyer

The abstract is:

Gloveboxes are essential to the pharmaceutical, semi-conductor, nuclear, and biochemical industries. While gloveboxes serve as effective containment systems, they are often difficult to work in and present a number of ergonomic hazards. One such hazard is injury to the rotator cuff, a group of tendons and muscles in the shoulder, connecting the upper arm to the shoulder blade. Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. This study compared the rotator cuff muscle strength ratios of glovebox workers to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forces produced for shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios significantly different from the healthy norm. Strength ratios were found to be a sound predictor of symptom incidence. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need for solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development. This increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.

Other articles in this issue are:

Whither CSB?
Harry J. Elston

A software for managing chemical processes in a multi-user laboratory
F.E. Camino

Rotator cuff strength balance in glovebox workers
Cindy M. Lawton, Amelia M. Weaver, Martha K.Y. Chan, Michael E. Cournoyer

Assessment of shooter’s task-based exposure to airborne lead and acidic gas at indoor and outdoor ranges
Jun Wang, Hailong Li, Marcio L.S. Bezerra

Make safety awareness a priority: Use a login software in your research facility
F.E. Camino

JCHAS Spotlight: Bowtie Diagrams

The Editor’s Spotlight for the May / June 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

Using bowtie methodology to support laboratory hazard identification, risk management, and incident analysis by Mary Beth Mulcahy, Chris Boylan,
Samuella Sigmann, and Ralph Stuart.

This is based on a technical program workshop which Mary Beth and Chris led at the 2016 San Diego ACS National Meeting and describes how a graphical tool for organized laboratory risk assessment and incident information can support a strong laboratory safety culture.

The abstract is:

Hazard prevention and control systems for specific laboratory processes must be readily shared between lab workers, their colleagues, and lab supervisors. In order for these control systems to be effective in a transferable and sustainable way, effective risk management communication tools must be present. These tools need to be adaptable and sustainable as research processes change in response to evolving scientific needs in discovery based laboratories.

In this manuscript, the application of a risk management tool developed in the oil and gas industry known as a ‘‘bowtie diagram’’ is assessed for application in the laboratory setting. The challenges of identifying laboratory hazards and managing associated risks as well as early experiences in adapting bowtie diagrams to the laboratory setting are described. Background information about the bowtie approach is provided and the technique illustrated using an academic laboratory research scenario. We also outline the role bowtie diagrams could play in a proactive safety culture program by facilitating hazard communication and maintaining hazard awareness across a wide spectrum of stakeholders.

 

After the Settlement: Today’s Chemical Safety Programs in the UCal System

What Have We Learned & Where Are We Going: Post-Settlement in the University of California

Organizers: D. Decker, J. Palmer

Moving from compliance to safety in UC laboratories. C.A. Merlic

2700 Miles and a big step forward: The UC settlement and Princeton University.

Beyond compliance: Building safety culture at UCLA. C. Dimock, S. Hsieh

Moving on after the settlement – the approach of a small University of California campus. K. Smith

Continuous improvement opportunities in the UC system post-settlement agreement. C.A. Jakober, D.M. Decker

Establishing a student-enforced safety culture in academic research labs. K.A. Miller

Successfully implementing a positive safety culture in an R1 research laboratory as a graduate safety of cer. B. Armstrong, A.K. Franz

Heavy lifting of compliance: A graduate student perspective. A. Manlove, B. Anderson, N. Nunez

Continuing to promote careful chemistry in the post-settlement era. J.G. Palmer, L.S. Wong

Information Flow in Environmental Health & Safety

Information Flow in Environmental Health & Safety

At the Spring, 2017 ACS national meeting, the Divisions of Chemical Information and Chemical Health and Safety co-sponsored a program on Information Flow in Environmental Health and Safety. The symposia presented a variety of use cases for chemical information tools that range from lab-specific to very general. Links to the PDF versions of the presentations are provided below.

A System, Not a Solution, R. Stuart

Chemical info needed to establish lab vent Control Bands, E. Sweet

Reaction Incident Information, C. Nitsche

Chemical Management Applications for the University of California, P. Painter

Safety Terminology, L. McEwen

Consult the SDS!, S. Sigmann

Grad Student Perspective on the ACS Risk Assessment Tool, K. Delinger

Explorit Everywhere for ACS Chem Safety, A. Lederman

EPA CompTox chemistry dashboard resource, A. Williams

Safety Training Content

Best Practices in Selecting & Presenting Safety Training Content

Technical presentations from the March, 2017 national American Chemical Safety meeting.

Connecting safety culture to academic mission,
R. Stuart

Preliminary Results of Survey,
E. Sweet

Flipped Classroom Techniques in Lab Safety Training
R. Izzo

Safety Culture & Training
M. Wilhelm

Relevant content positive attitude memorable presentation,
K. Fivizzani