Category Archives: Reference material

JCHAS Editor’s Spotlight for Nov / Dec 2018

The Editor’s Spotlight for the November / December 2018 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

Expedient destruction of organic peroxides including triacetone triperoxide (TATP) in emergency situations by Damien Reid, Bruce Riches, Andrew Rowan, Michael Logan

You can download the paper in PDF format here.

The authoring team are:

  • Damien Reid is affiliated with Research and Scientific Branch, Queensland Fire and Emergency Ser- vices, G.P.O. Box 1425, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia.
  • Bruce Riches is affiliated with Research and Scientific Branch, Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, G.P.O. Box 1425, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia.
  • Andrew Rowan is affiliated with Forensic Services Group, Queensland Police Service, Australia.
  • Michael Logan is affiliated with Research and Scientific Branch, Queensland Fire and Emergency Ser- vices, G.P.O. Box 1425, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia
Other papers in this issue include:

Boston safety! 
Harry J. Elston 

Comment on Letter from Dr. Edward Behrman – Laboratory Safety – A Contrary View 
Robert H. Hill 

Lessons learned in several laboratory upgrades 
L.C. Cadwallader, R.J. Pawelko 

Safety culture and safety compliance in academic laboratories: A Canadian perspective 
Helene-Rosina Ayi, Chun-Yip Hon 

Incomplete understanding of biogas chemical hazards — Serious gas poisoning accident while unloading food waste at biogas plant 
Frank Huess Hedlund, Michael Madsen 

Expedient destruction of organic peroxides including triacetone triperoxide (TATP) in emergency situations 
Damien Reid, Bruce Riches, Andrew Rowan, Michael Logan 

DCHAS Lab Risk Assessment Video available!

Thanks to an Innovative Project Grant from the American Chemical Society to the Division of Chemical Health and Safety, we are able to share the video below with the research chemistry community. The video is 2 minutes and 12 seconds long and provides an overview of the reasons that conducting a risk assessment of laboratory work is so important to maintaining situational awareness as laboratory work proceeds.

The video is meant for sharing – it carries a non-commercial, by attribution Creative Commons license and can be downloaded here.

In addition, the Division has developed a powerpoint file to serve as a teaching that accompanies the video. You can download the powerpoint file here:

Our thanks for their help with this video to :
1. Rachel Brian of Blue Seat Studios for her creativity
2. Tim Gallagher of the University of Bristol in the UK for suggesting this video and his ongoing collaboration in developing the content
3. The more that 300 people who viewed previous versions of the video and the many people who provided helpful suggestions for improving those versions.
4. The ACS Innovative Projects Grant program for funding this project.

Comments and questions about this video can be directed to Ralph Stuart, membership chair of DCHAS at membership@dchas.org

JCHAS Editor’s Spotlight: Chemical safety education for the 21st century

The Editor’s Spotlight for the May / June 2018 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

Chemical safety education for the 21st century — Fostering safety information competency in chemists by
Samuella Sigmann

The abstract for this article is:

During the education process, each person strives to acquire the necessary skill set or set of competencies needed to be successful in their selected career. For example, a job listing for a bench chemist might state that the successful applicant should have a BS in chemistry, (knowledge), be familiar with common laboratory operations (skills), and be a contributing member of a team (attitude). It is our job as curriculum designers and educators to give our students the competencies they will need to be successful. The chemistry curriculum must include those competencies needed for working safely in a chemistry research laboratory.

This can be accomplished by weaving the knowledge component of competencies spirally into the chemistry major’s curriculum. We cannot assume that a student who has successfully completed a bachelor’s degree in chemistry has acquired the necessary competencies to perform a risk assessment or read a safety data sheet (SDS). Skill-based laboratory activity is valuable and can be specifically transferred to the next task, but knowledge and attitudes assist future learning in a nonspecific transfer and must be taught as ideas and principles. This work looks at the competencies required to be a chemist from an historical point and suggests ways that chemical safety information can be infused into the twenty-first century chemistry curriculum using embedded safety professionals, risk assessment, and SDSs to broaden and deepen safety knowledge.

This article and the rest of the issue can be found at ScienceDirect site

Also included in this issue of JCHAS are:

Chemical safety information in the 21st century
Ralph Stuart

Collecting reaction incident information: Engaging the community in sharing safety learnings
Carmen I. Nitsche, Gabrielle Whittick, Mark Manfredi

Baseline survey of academic chemical safety information practices
Leah McEwen, Ralph Stuart, Ellen Sweet, Robin Izzo

The chemical safety gateway: Beyond Google’s limitations
Abe Lederman, Sol Lederman

ACS’s Hazard Assessment in Research Laboratories website: An important safety culture tool
Kendra Leahy Denlinger

JCHAS Editor’s Spotlight: Chemical suicides: Hazards and how to manage them

The Editor’s Spotlight for the March / April 2018 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

Chemical suicides: Hazards and how to manage them by
Michael Logan and Christina  Baxter

Michael Logan is affiliated with Research and Scientific Branch, Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, GPO BOX 1425, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia.

Christina Baxter is affiliated with Emergency Response TIPS, LLC, Woodbridge, Virginia 22191, USA.

The abstract for this article is:

Emergency response to chemical suicides has become more common place in recent years. In order to address the operational implications of these events, it is first important to understand the methodologies which are commonly used, the locations where the events often occur, the concentrations of material generated, and how those concentration relates to exposure standards and flammability. Using hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, and phosphine as examples, guidance is offered about risk control measures including personal protective equipment and decontamination strategies to effectively and safely mitigate the incidents.

This article and the rest of the issue can be found at ScienceDirect site

Also included in this issue of JCHAS are:

Expanding our Boarders: Safety at ABCChem 2018

Anatomy of an incident—Multiple failure of safety systems under stress
Hugo Schmidt

Make safety a habit!
Robert H. Hill

The state of the arts: Chemical safety — 1937 to 2017
Monona Rossol

Contamination control monitoring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Plutonium Facility
Michael E. Cournoyer

March, 2018 Webinar Follow-up

In the 21st century, chemistry research is more varied and expansive than ever before, the rules that keep one lab safe will not adequately address the possible risks in others. Rather than having a universal set of rules, a more adaptive system is needed for both academic and industry labs. Ralph Stuart, Chemical Hygiene Officer at Keene State College, and Samuella Sigmann, Senior Lecturer at Appalachian State University, propose a new way of thinking that builds a dynamic safety system based on your own needs and conditions as well as provides resources on how such programs can be developed.

You can download a PDF of the presentation here.

The webinar was attended by over 850 people, who asked many more interesting questions than we were able to answer during the webinar. We built a web page to answer questions we didn’t get to and  provide our initial answers. Some of these questions have many possible answers. Let us know if you have comments or questions on what we’ve said or ask an additional question on the web page.

In case you’re curious, you can see what some of the comments from those who attended in the 2018-03-08 Safety Webinar Speaker Feedback infographic.

 

JCHAS Editor’s Spotlight: A methodology on how to create a real-life relevant risk profile for a given nanomaterial

The Editor’s Spotlight for the January / February 2018 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

A methodology on how to create a real-life relevant risk profile for a given nanomaterial
by Christa Schimpel, Susanne Resch,  Guillaume Flament,  David Carlander, and Izaskun Bustero

The abstract for this Open access article is:

With large amounts of nanotoxicology studies delivering contradicting results and a complex, moving regulatory framework, potential risks surrounding nanotechnology appear complex and confusing. Many researchers and workers in different sectors are dealing with nanomaterials on a day-to-day basis, and have a requirement to define their assessment/management needs.

This paper describes an industry-tailored strategy for risk assessment of nanomaterials and nano-enabled products, which builds on recent research outcomes. The approach focuses on the creation of a risk profile for a given nanomaterial (e.g., determine which materials and/or process operation pose greater risk, where these risks occur in the lifecycle, and the impact of these risks on society), using state-of-the-art safety assessment approaches/tools (ECETOC TRA, Stoffenmanager Nano and ISO/TS 12901-2:2014).

The developed nanosafety strategy takes into account cross-sectoral industrial needs and includes:

  • (i) Information Gathering: Identification of nanomaterials and hazards by a demand-driven questionnaire and on-site company visits in the context of human and ecosystem exposures, considering all companies/parties/downstream users involved along the value chain;
  • (ii) Hazard Assessment: Collection of all relevant and available information on the intrinsic properties of the substance (e.g., peer reviewed (eco)toxicological data, material safety data sheets), as well as identification of actual recommendations and benchmark limits for the different nano-objects in the scope of this projects;
  • (iii) Exposure Assessment: Definition of industry-specific and application-specific exposure scenarios taking into account operational conditions and risk management measures;
  • (iv) Risk Characterisation: Classification of the risk potential by making use of exposure estimation models (i.e., comparing estimated exposure levels with threshold levels);
  • (v) Refined Risk Characterisation and Exposure Monitoring: Selection of individual exposure scenarios for exposure monitoring following the OECD Harmonized Tiered Approach to refine risk assessment;
  • (vi) Risk Mitigation Strategies: Development of risk mitigation actions focusing on risk prevention.

This article and the rest of the issue can be found at ScienceDirect site

Also included in this issue of JCHAS are:

Don’t ever tell me…
Harry J. Elston

Photocatalytic degradation of phenol solution using Zinc Oxide/UV
Original research article
H. Dewidar, S.A. Nosier, A.H. El-Shazly

A methodology on how to create a real-life relevant risk profile for a given nanomaterial
Open access – Original research article
Christa Schimpel, Susanne Resch,  Guillaume Flament,  David Carlander, and Izaskun Bustero

A case history of legacy chemical cleanup in the lab
Original research article
L.C. Cadwallader, R.J. Pawelko

Development of custom calibration factors for respirable silica using standard methods compared to photometric monitoring data
Pages 27-35
Leon F. Pahler, Danielle D. McKenzie-Smith, Rodney G. Handy, Darrah K. Sleeth

Engineering intervention to reduce API dust exposure during milling operation
Original research article
Vivek Kanjiyangat, Manikandan Hareendran

UPCOMING EVENTS

JCHAS Editor’s Spotlight: Comparison between active and passive workplace sampling

The Editor’s Spotlight for the November / December 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

A comparison study between passive and active workplace personal air monitoring techniques for airborne isopropyl alcohol concentrations
by
Austin K.Simons, Rodney G.Handy, Darrah K.Sleeth, Leon F.Pahler and Matthew S.Thiese

The abridged abstract is:
This research project involved a comparison between the performance of active and passive sampling methods used to collect isopropyl alcohol vapor in an industrial setting. This field experiment was conducted in a real-world industry setting with workers exposed to isopropyl alcohol. Based on the strong correlation values and the trend of passive samplers reporting higher results than the active samplers, occupational health specialists could reliably use the passive samplers in this study to demonstrate compliance to isopropyl alcohol exposure limits.

This article and the rest of the issue can be found at
http://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/journal-of-chemical-health-and-safety/vol/24/issue/6

Also included in this issue of JCHAS are:

Editorial: What a year!
Harry J. Elston

Safety and ethics in ACS and major scientific and engineering societies: A gap analysis
Daniel R. Kuespert

Response letter from CEPA to “Safety and Ethics in ACS and Major Scientific and Engineering Societies: A Gap Analysis”
The ACS Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs

Safety and health risk perceptions: A cross-sectional study of New Jersey hair and nail salon clients
Lindsey J. Milich, Derek G. Shendell, Judith M. Graber

UN-GHS — Physical hazard classifications of chemicals: A critical review of combinations of hazard classes
Cordula Wilrich, Elisabeth Brandes, Heike Michael-Schulz, Volkmar Schröder, Klaus-Dieter Wehrstedt

A comparison of occupational exposure limits and their relationship to reactive oxide species
Original research article
Tracy Zontek, Burton R. Ogle, Scott Hollenbeck, John T. Jankovic

Characterising bias in regulatory risk and decision analysis

There’s an interesting, although dense, article at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016303877
entitled “Characterising bias in regulatory risk and decision analysis: An analysis of heuristics applied in health technology appraisal, chemicals regulation, and climate change governance”. It describes the root issues that many of us face in using specific tools (GHS, Job Hazard Analysis, Control Banding, etc.) to make decisions in the face of uncertainty. I am particularly interested in the article’s discussion of decision rules in Table 1 and how that compares to the various approaches outlined in Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories.

In my mind, the goal of the article is to remind us to put some error bars arounds our decision-making criteria as we proceed with any of these approaches.

JCHAS Spotlight: Literature Review – Remediation of Meth Labs

The Editor’s Spotlight for the September / October 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

Remediation of manufactured methamphetamine in clandestine laboratories: A Literature Review

By Clyde V. Owens

The abstract is:

The purpose of the current literature review was to identify, collect, review, and organize all available information concerning clandestine laboratories used to produce methamphetamine through an analysis of routinely collected data sources. There were numerous peer reviewed journals, electronic databases, websites, and commercial vendors relevant to the remediation process of methamphetamine laboratories. Our intention in this review was to produce background information as well as a reference guide relating to the critical problem of methamphetamine production nationally and internationally in addition to generat- ing future research projects associated with the topic. This literature review determined there has not been a national standardized analytical method recognized as a reference guideline for the remediation of clandestine laboratories for production of methamphetamine.

Other articles in this issue are:

A new language
Harry J. Elston

The efficacy of alkalized liquid hydrogen peroxide for the remediation of manufactured methamphetamine in clandestine laboratories Original Research Article
Clyde V. Owens

Accumulation and risk assessment of heavy metal contents in school playgrounds in Port Harcourt Metropolis, Rivers State, Nigeria Original Research Article
Chioma Joy Okereke, Peter Uchenna Amadi

Development and psychometric evaluation of the Research Laboratory Safe Behavior Survey (RLSBS) Original Research Article
Eric F. Jorgensen

Addressing as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) issues: Investigation of worker collective external and extremity dose data
Original Research Article
Michael E. Cournoyer, Stephen A. Costigan, Stephen B. Schreiber

JCHAS Spotlight: Ergonomics of Glove Boxes

The Editor’s Spotlight for the July / August 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

Rotator cuff strength balance in glovebox workers (link to PDF version)

By Cindy M. Lawton, Amelia M. Weaver, Martha K.Y. Chan, Michael E. Cournoyer

The abstract is:

Gloveboxes are essential to the pharmaceutical, semi-conductor, nuclear, and biochemical industries. While gloveboxes serve as effective containment systems, they are often difficult to work in and present a number of ergonomic hazards. One such hazard is injury to the rotator cuff, a group of tendons and muscles in the shoulder, connecting the upper arm to the shoulder blade. Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. This study compared the rotator cuff muscle strength ratios of glovebox workers to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forces produced for shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios significantly different from the healthy norm. Strength ratios were found to be a sound predictor of symptom incidence. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need for solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development. This increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.

Other articles in this issue are:

Whither CSB?
Harry J. Elston

A software for managing chemical processes in a multi-user laboratory
F.E. Camino

Rotator cuff strength balance in glovebox workers
Cindy M. Lawton, Amelia M. Weaver, Martha K.Y. Chan, Michael E. Cournoyer

Assessment of shooter’s task-based exposure to airborne lead and acidic gas at indoor and outdoor ranges
Jun Wang, Hailong Li, Marcio L.S. Bezerra

Make safety awareness a priority: Use a login software in your research facility
F.E. Camino