Pilot Safety Data Usability Survey – March 2016

Page Contents

Descriptions of the Laboratory Use Case


Based on the OSHA definition of laboratory, the laboratory use case involves “laboratory scale” quantities of chemicals and includes hazard control measures appropriate to this setting. These measures are:

  • general and local ventilation;
  • appropriate personal protective equipment;
  • waste disposal management systems; and
  • emergency planning and response support services.

In this context, the questions to be answered by those planning and overseeing prudent use of hazardous chemicals are:

  • Does the use of this chemical require the use of a fume hood or other local ventilation system?
  • What PPE is appropriate for the use of this chemical? What are the advantages and disadvantages of using PPE with this chemical?
  • What waste disposal protocols are required to legally dispose of this chemical?
  • Are unusual emergency response protocols necessary for work involving this chemical?
  • Are there specific chemical reactivity hazards associated with the use of this chemical that all users should be aware of?

Types of Laboratories

Within the general category of “laboratory“, there are 3 types of labs whose use of hazardous chemicals can be further described. Differences in these use cases may impact the safety information needed to address the questions above.

  • Teaching laboratory setting: short term use of specific chemicals at specific concentrations in procedures with expected outcomes; close oversight of inexperienced lab workers by experienced personnel can be assumed. Quantities of chemicals used are likely to be at the lower edge of “laboratory scale” as defined by OSHA. (less than 500 ml/student)
  • Research laboratory setting: evolving use of chemicals with uncertain process outcomes for lengths of time determined by results of work; diverse group of lab workers with loose supervision by experienced personnel. Quantities of chemicals used are unpredictable, as are concentrations.
  • Service laboratory setting: long term use of specific chemicals in similar processes with reproducible outcomes on an long term basis. Quantities of chemicals used are likely to be at the upper edge of “laboratory scale” as defined by OSHA (use of 1 to 5 gallons at a time). Note: some labs conducting research in allied sciences may use chemicals more like a service lab than like a research lab.

Non-Laboratory Use Cases


Prudent Practices identifies these use cases as not likely to be well served by the LCSS format. Consider the value of the information sources reviewed for one of these use cases:

  • Household use of a chemical: quantities of chemicals similar to lab uses, but used in accordance with manufacturer instructions to achieve a specific outcome
  • Commercial, manufacturing, or other large-scale use of chemicals;
  • Consequences of abuse of a chemical by deliberate ingestion, inhalation, or injection;
  • Environmental effects of release, disposal, or incineration of a chemical;
  • Hazmat response
  • Shipment or transportation of a chemical in accordance with applicable laws and regulations.

 

Links to Chemical Safety Data Sources

Chemical group Chemical Sigma Aldrich SDS Wikipedia Chembox Prudent Practices LCSS PubChem LCSS Full PubChem Record
the most recent Safety Data Sheets from Sigma-Aldrich’s web site the Chembox on the right side of the Wikipedia entry generally contains some safety data the LCSS from the 1995 edition of Prudent Practices the LCSS data view from PubChem the complete PubChem Record for this chemical
A Acetic Acid Acetic acid Acetic acid Wikipedia entry Acetic acid PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
A Chloroform Chloroform Chloroform Wikipedia entry chloroform PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
A Diethyl Ether Diethylether Diethyl_ether Wikipedia entry diethylether PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
A Nitric acid Nitric acid Nitric_acid Wikipedia entry Nitric acid PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
B Acetone Acetone Acetone Wikipedia entry acetone PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
B Dichloromethane Dichloromethane Dichloromethane Wikipedia entry dichloromethane PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
B Hexanes Hexanes Hexane Wikipedia entry hexane PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
B Sodium Hydroxide Solution 50% Sodium hydroxide 50% Sodium hydroxide Wikipedia entry Sodium and
potassium hydroxide PP LCSS
Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
C Acetonitrile Acetonitrile Acetonitrile Wikipedia entry acetonitrile PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
C Dimethyl Sulfoxide Dimethyl Sulfoxide Dimethyl_sulfoxide Wikipedia entry dimethylsulfoxide PP LCSS Pubchem full record
C Hydrochloric Acid Hydrochloric Acid Hydrochloric acid Wikipedia entry Hydrochloric acid
and hydrogen chloride PP LCSS
Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
C Propanol Propanol 1-Propanol Wikipedia entry Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
D Ammonium persulfate Ammonium persulfate Ammonium_persulfate Wikipedia entry Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
D Ethyl Alcohol Ethanol Ethanol Wikipedia entry ethanol PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
D Ntiric acid
10-20%
Nitric acid 10-20% Nitric_acid Wikipedia entry Nitric acid PP LCSS Pubchem LCSS Pubchem full record
D Sodium Nitrate Sodiumnitrate Sodium nitrate Wikipedia entry Pubchem full record

 

If you would like to participate in this survey, contact Ralph Stuart at secretary@dchas.org to request a link to the survey itself.

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