Tag Archives: Hazard Assessment

Update on Chemical Safety Information in PubChem

PubChem LCSS Update – March 2017

The PubChem database, hosted by the US National Library of Medicine, includes a wide variety of data on over 90 million chemical compounds. PubChem’s  goal  is to make this data accessible to chemists, chemical safety professionals, chemical educators and others working with laboratory chemicals. Data are reported from multiple sources, allowing users to compare and determine the best use of this data in their work. The data are also organized to facilitate downloading in a variety of formats as well via programmatic access for reuse in local software applications.

In addition to structural, physical and toxicological raw data, the PubChem collection includes chemical safety information from national and international agencies. For human browsers, this chemical safety information in PubChem is organized into a data view based on the Laboratory Chemical Safety Summary (LCSS) format described in “Prudent Practices in the Laboratory“.  This LCSS view chemical and physical properties and safety information for compounds that have Globally Harmonized System designations publicly available. The number of records with this chemical safety information has increased from 3000 in 2015 to more than 103,000 today. LCSS data provided by PubChem are intended to support, but not replacelaboratory risk assessments, Safety Data Sheets and institutional guidance for safe laboratory practices and procedures.

Notably, the data compiled by PubChem includes safety information beyond that generally provided by Safety Data Sheets. This additional information is found in sources such as the NIOSH Pocket Guide, CAMEO and European Chemicals Agency, among others. There are also specific incompatible reactions reported from the  Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), sourced from Sigma Aldrich Safety Center notes, the National Fire Protection Association Fire Protection Guide to Hazardous Materials, Sax’s Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials, Bretherick’s Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards and others.

LCSS data can be viewed online, or downloaded either by individual compound or in bulk.  In this way, PubChem information can be used to support electronic safety tools such as institutional chemical inventory management systems or laboratory-specific personal protective equipment guidelines. More information about this feature can be found here.

Traffic to the safety information in PubChem has increased over 80% in the past year. The PubChem staff are interested in continuing to improve the usability and accessibility of this information to the laboratory community. To this end, representatives of the ACS Divisions of Chemical Information (CINF) and Chemical Health and Safety (CHAS) are working with the PubChem staff to identify additional sources and uses for health and safety data. Efforts are also underway to improve annotation of the data and enable more specific data retrieval options.  We welcome  ideas for organization and presentation of the data. To participate or provide comments, contact the CINF safety representative, Leah McEwen at lrm1@cornell.edu or the CHAS secretary, Ralph Stuart at ralph.stuart@keene.edu.

An exposure assessment of desktop 3D printing

The Editor’s Spotlight for the March / April 2017 issue of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety is shining on:

An exposure assessment of desktop 3D printing by Tracy L. Zontek, Burton R. Ogle, John T. Jankovic, and Scott M. Hollenbeck

A preliminary hazard analysis of 3D printing included process monitoring in two working environments; a small well ventilated materials development laboratory with a Makerbot printer (polylactic acid filament) and a poorly ventilated lab, home-like in terms of room size and ventilation with a Da Vinci XYZ printer (acrylonitrile- butadiene-styrene).

Particle number, size and mass concentration were measured within the printer enclosures, breathing zone, and room simultaneously. Number concentrations were elevated above background typically in the 103 – 105 particles/cm3 range. During printing >99% of the aerosol number concentration was within the ultrafine particulate (UFP) and nanoscale size range. Condensed aerosol emissions from the Da Vinci XYZ printer was examined by Fourier infra-red spectroscopy and suggested isocyanic acid and n-decane as two possible chemical components. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis by X-ray identified individual and aggregated particles highly suggestive of combustion, accompanied by a variety of metallic elements.

Adverse health effects associated with 3D printing related to chemical vapor off-gassing in well ventilated space appears to be low. At this point the significance of ultrafine particle emission is under growing suspicion in its relationship to inflammatory, pulmonary, and cardiovascular effects. Preliminary recommendations for particulate control developed from this analysis are based on good industrial hygiene practice rather than compelling adverse health effects.

You can download the complete article here. An exposure assessment of desktop 3D printing

Chemical, Sample & Asset Management Tools

Wednesday’s presentations on Chemical, Sample & Asset Management Tools discussed a variety of aspects of how the safety program collects, organizes and uses data and information related to chemicals and their hazards. The morning’s presentations focused on chemical inventories: why institutions need them; some platforms for collecting and reporting the information associated with them; and what they look like “on the ground”.

The afternoon presentations took a more global approach to chemical safety information in the lab, discussing the organizational, environmental and information contexts of this data.  The last speaker of the day described an emerging innovative approach to collecting “Lessons Learned” information from laboratory events,

Chemical inventories: What are they good for? R. Stuart

How UNHCEMS has evolved from a Chemical Inventory Tracking system to an Environmental Management Tool. C. Myer, P. Collins, A. Glode

Use of RFID and scanning technologies for managing large Chemical Inventories. J.M. Pickel 10:25: Intermission.

Developing a cloud based chemical inventory application for the University of California System (UC Chemicals). H. Weizman

Using a chemical inventory system to optimize safe laboratory research. G. Baysinger, R. Creed, L.M. Gibbs

Chemical stockroom management: Lessons learned ten years in. S.B. Sigmann

UC Safety: An Integrated Approach to Your Chemical Management Needs (link to demo site) J. Ballinger

PubChem’s Laboratory Chemical Safety Summary (LCSS). S. Kim, J. Zhang, A. Gindulyte, P. Thiessen, L. McEwen, R. Stuart, E. Bolton, S. Bryant

Socio-Legal Issues in the Application of Semantic Web Technology to Chemical Safety. J.G. Frey, M.I. Borkum

Precompetitive collaboration to advance laboratory safety C.I. Nitsche. Link to the project web site.

Developing, Implementing & Teaching Hazard Assessment Tools

Tuesday’s presentations discussed the Developing, Implementing & Teaching Hazard Assessment Tools from a variety of points of view, including their impact on lab safety culture; their role as an information and educational process in the laboratory; and how institutions can provide oversight of the quality of this work.

The afternoon session was a 3 hour workshop that discussed how the Bowtie Methodology to hazard and incident analysis can be applied in the laboratory sessions through several examples worked through in small groups.

Creating a Culture of Safety: APLU Recommendations and Tools for Universities and Colleges. K. Jeskie

Parsing the Chemical Risk Assessment Process for the Laboratory. R. Stuart

Incorporating Hazard Assessment into Laboratory Curricula: One Pathway to Growing a Sustainable Safety Culture. L.J. Tirri

A Remarkable Advance in Lab Coats for Chemical Exposure Prevention C.A. Merlic

Software Tools to Assist and Promote Laboratory Safety. C.A. Merlic, S.M. Hussain

Using Case Studies and Receving Ancillary Benefits Through Instruction and Use of What-If Hazard Reviews in an Academic Research Environment. K.W. Kretchman

System to identify, analyze and control the hazards of laboratory researcher at Argonne National Laboratory. S. Baumann, S. Rupkey

Hazard Review and Approval System at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. S.G. Ringen

Development of a database for hazard assessment and work approval in the Material Measurement Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). E. Mackey, C. Vogel, B. Brass

Introduction to Bowtie Methodology for a Laboratory Setting. C. Boylan, M.B. Mulcahy

Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories

PDF versions of DCHAS technical presentations from the Fall, 2013 ACS National Meeting